Saturday, May 23, 2020

Significance of Psychosocial Competence in Youth - 1468 Words

Significance of Psychosocial Competence in Youth Executive Summary Stress is one of the top ten health concerns in adolescence and is getting worse. Adolescents experience many changes in their daily lives, however are not sufficiently equipped with skills to help them deal with the increased demands and stress they experience (World Health Organization, 1997). Psychosocial competence in youth was researched in order to better understand their abilities to make the best choice as related to mental, emotional, and physical challenges they experience. This report will examine the significance of psychosocial competence in adolescents, and its relationship to functioning effectively. Furthermore, research reviewed the encouragement of†¦show more content†¦These types of responses can result in â€Å"personal drug and alcohol use, running away from home, prolonged sadness and crying, unusual impulsivity or recklessness or dramatic changes in personal habits† (Clarke, 2006). It is important that adolescents develop coping skills befo re stress results in negative physical, mental, and cognitive outcomes (Terzian amp; Nguyen, 2010). Ultimately, the ability to understand the dynamics of stress and choose a healthy coping strategy is a fundamental role in an adolescent’s life. Most young people will develop and assume the responsibility for their stress, but evidence supports the significance of psychosocial competence and the advantages adolescents gain by having the skills to effectively face the interminable challenges they experience (Chandra, 2006). Promotion of Psychosocial Competence through Life Skills Training The most direct intervention for the promotion of psychosocial competence is enhancing a person’s life skills. Life skills teach individuals to translate knowledge, attitudes and values into actual abilities that help them deal with the demands and challenges of their everyday lives. Life skills for psychosocial competence in young people look at the generic and practical life skills in relation to common health and social problems (WHO, 1997). The methods used in teaching life skills to young people are active acquisitions,Show MoreRelatedThe Practical Application of the Age of Criminal Responsibilities1497 Words   |  6 Pagesof criminal responsibilities set at a young age. There have been many studies completed that give appreciation to the rights of children and give an understanding of their specific capabilities. Being informed about children’s culpability, their competence to participate in the criminal justice system (CJS) and the consequences of criminalisi ng them at a young age are crucial areas that need to be looked at in detail when thinking of setting with a minimum age of criminal responsibilities (FarmerRead MoreErik Homberger Erikson s Life Of The Lakota And The Yurok1085 Words   |  5 Pageswriter. He has wrote many books and essays such as Childhood and Society (1950), Youngman Luther (1958), Youth: change and challenge (1963), Etc. Erikson went on to teach at a clinic in Massachusetts then back to Harvard before he retired in 1970. In 1994 Erikson passed away at the age of 92. Erikson’s main contribution to psychology was his developmental theory. He developed eight psychosocial stages of development and believed that each stage presents a crisis that must be resolved before one canRead MoreThe Effects Of Bullying On Different Adults People2469 Words   |  10 Pageseach school, and all students in classrooms of selected teachers. Multilevel analyses revealed that psychosocial climate was strongly related to reductions in bullying-related attitudes and behaviors. Intervention status yielded only one significant main effect, although, STR schools with positive psychosocial climate at baseline had less victimization at posttest. Findings suggest positive psychosocial climate, from staff and student perspective, plays a foundational role in bullying prevention, andRead MoreEriksons Psychosocial Development Theory10839 Words   |  44 Pageserik eriksons psychosocial crisis life cycle model - the eight stages of human development Eriksons model of psychosocial development is a very significant, highly regarded and meaningful concept. Life is a serious of lessons and challenges which help us to grow. Eriksons wonderful theory helps to tell us why. The theory is helpful for child development, and adults too. For the lite version, heres a quick diagram and summary. Extra details follow the initial overview. For more informationRead More Identity of Humans Essay1936 Words   |  8 Pagesplace at all levels of mental functioning, by which the individual judges himself in the light of what he perceives to be the way in which others judge him in comparison to themselves. Erikson also stated that this identity struggle is of great significance for adolescents.8 According to Erikson’s theory, society offers teenagers a time relatively free from adult responsibility where they are expected to explore social roles and personality styles, make decisions about important issues, and integrateRead MoreCongenital Heart Disease ( Chd )3504 Words   |  15 Pageslower physical and psychosocial quality of life (QOL) (Drakouli et al., 2015). QOL has been noted to be significantly impaired in children and adults with CHD, and this population may require psychological and/or psychosocial interventions to help reduce depressive symptoms and improve QOL (Lane, Millane, Lip, 2013). QOL in the child with CHD has been examined extensively by comparing age, socioeconomic factors, parental vs. child perspective, neurocognitive and psychosocial factors, severity ofRead MorePersonality Development4478 Words   |  18 Pagesinterpretation to their experiences makes the concept of self critical to the childs personality. An advantage of awarding importance to a concept of self and personality development is that the process of identification with parents and others gains in significance. All children wish to possess the qualities that their culture regards as good. Some of these qualities are the product of identification with each parent. [pic][pic][pic]A final source of hypotheses regarding the origins of personality comes fromRead MoreEvaluation Of Neurological Role Of Self Regulation2101 Words   |  9 Pagesconsidered to be a direct result of an inability to regulate negative affect (Jackson, Malmstadt, Larson, Davidson, 2000). Oschner et al. (2002) suggest that reappraising functions as a coping strategy encouraging resilience by reducing the emotional significance, so that the medial orbital frontal cortex and the amygdala no longer register the stimuli as aversive thereby decreasing their salience and the negative affectivity. Though the paper by Oschner et al. (2002) provides valuable insight into theRead MorePower Duties of a Social Worker4076 Words   |  14 Pagesthroughout this volume, this means that we need to consider carefully in our practice the dimensions of race and ethnicity, including not only their significance for human functioning but also their impact on service delivery. In this regard, Pecora, P. J., W. R. Seelig, F. A. Zirps, and S. M. Davis, eds. (1996) assert: Training practitioners for competence with diverse populations is high on the list of corrective initiatives to address †¦ inadequacies in social work practice. A critical component ofRead MoreThe Applicability of Resiliency Models in Explaining the Prediction of Depressive Symptoms From Rumination1597 Words   |  7 Pagesagainst depressive symptoms. It has been revealed that hope provides an individual with positive emotions such as optimism, happiness, perseverance, motivation, a sense of achievement (Kashdan et al., 2002; Peterson, 2000; Synder et al., 1991), social competence (Snyder et al., 1997), and life satisfaction (Bailey, Eng, Frisch, Snyder, 2007; Shorey, Little, Snyder, Kluck, Robitschek, 2007). Hope theory also suggests that individuals with hope are less likely to perceive barriers as being stressful at

Tuesday, May 12, 2020

Lao Tzu And Machiavelli Analysis - 1038 Words

There are many indescribable qualities that make a leader. However, a leader can be interpreted differently. A leader must ensure the safety of his subjects, however, there are different ways in which to do so. The absence of admirable leadership leads to chaos and social unrest. Within Lao Tzu’s Thoughts from the Tao-Te-Ching and Machiavelli’s The Prince, there are similar ideas surrounding the definition of a leader. They ultimately explore their idea of what an optimal government would be like; more specifically, what an ideal leader is and how they can maintain social tranquility. Even though both authors contemplate what a leader is, both of their opinions differ, and it is most transparent through their stance of war and their†¦show more content†¦Without peace, we cannot be content or satisfied. By using a hypothetical of the Master, a figure who is all knowing, it shows the audience how government should be. The Master is all knowing, he knows right fro m wrong. By doing this the audience is more attuned to hearing Lao Tzu’s points. If the Master is really virtuous as he is described we would expect him to be omniscient. Man is an enigma. Man is something vast, complicated, that philosophers have been trying to figure for centuries. Different minds have different perceptions. Lao Tzu, for instance, believed that government should trust its people, and not micromanage. He believed people are naturally good, but oppressing them brings out the worst in them. Rulers have to be humble and take care of their people, focusing on matters that are important to their people, not getting caught up in the affairs of other countries. â€Å"If you don’t trust the people/ you make them untrustworthy,† (Lao Tzu 58). This statement illustrates how a government is always on edge believing its citizens are going to do something, then they are. If one were to label someone as insane, then that person could not escape from the idea that they are insane. If a government were to control their citizens because they do not trust their citizens then they create a vast majority of laws, all citizens are forced to obey. Their sense of virtue is taken away,Show MoreRelatedEvaluating Historical Views of Leadership Essay1194 Words   |  5 Pages Evaluating Historical Views of Leadership March 9, 2014 University of Phoenix Evaluating Historical Views of Leadership This paper evaluates the leadership views of Plato, Aristotle, Lao-Tzu, and Machiavelli from the point of view of the modern military leader. The process of evaluation includes an examination of the commonalities and disparities between these views of leadership. The paper explores a definition of modern military leadership. The paper includes an assessment of theRead MoreOrganizational Behaviour Analysis28615 Words   |  115 PagesORGANISATIONAL ANALYSIS: Notes and essays for the workshop to be held on 15th - 16th Novemeber 2007 at The Marriot Hotel Slough Berkshire SL3 8PT Dr. Lesley Prince, C.Psychol., AFBPsS University of Birmingham November 2007  © Dr. Lesley Prince 2007. Organisational Analysis: Notes and Essays Page i Page ii Please do not attempt to eat these notes. CONTENTS Introduction to the Workshop Topics And Themes The Nature and Scope of Organisation Theory Levels of Analysis The Metaphorical

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Flood Monitoring System Free Essays

string(59) " in the Rambla del Albuj\? n watershed, in Southern Spain\." Sensors 2012, 12, 4213-4236; doi:10. 3390/s120404213 OPEN ACCESS sensors ISSN 1424-8220 www. mdpi. We will write a custom essay sample on Flood Monitoring System or any similar topic only for you Order Now com/journal/sensors Article A Real-Time Measurement System for Long-Life Flood Monitoring and Warning Applications Rafael Marin-Perez 1, , Javier Garc? a-Pintado 2,3 and Antonio Skarmeta G? mez 1 ? o 1 Department of Information and Communication Engineering, University of Murcia, Campus de Espinardo, E-30100, Murcia, Spain; E-Mail: skarmeta@um. es 2 Euromediterranean Water Institute, Campus de Espinardo, E-30100, Murcia, Spain; E-Mail: jgarciapintado@gmail. om 3 National Centre for Earth Observation, University of Reading, Harry Pitt Building, 3 Earley Gate, Whiteknights, Reading RG6 6AL, UK Author to whom correspondence should be addressed; E-Mail: rafael81@um. es. Received: 7 February 2012; in revised form: 14 March 2012 / Accepted: 22 March 2012 / Published: 28 March 2012 Abstract: A ? ood warning system incorporates telemetered rainfall and ? ow/water level data measured at various locations in the catchment area. Real-time accurate data collection is required for this use, and sensor networks improve the system capabilities. However, existing sensor nodes struggle to satisfy the hydrological requirements in terms of autonomy, sensor hardware compatibility, reliability and long-range communication. We describe the design and development of a real-time measurement system for ? ood monitoring, and its deployment in a ? ash-? ood prone 650 km2 semiarid watershed in Southern Spain. A developed low-power and long-range communication device, so-called DatalogV1, provides automatic data gathering and reliable transmission. DatalogV1 incorporates self-monitoring for adapting measurement schedules for consumption management and to capture events of interest. Two tests are used to assess the success of the development. The results show an autonomous and robust monitoring system for long-term collection of water level data in many sparse locations during ? ood events. Keywords: real-time data acquisition; sensor network; hydrological monitoring; ? ood warning system Sensors 2012, 12 1. Introduction 4214 A warmer climate, with its increased climate variability, will increase the risk of both ? oods and droughts [1], whose management and mitigation are important to protect property, life, and natural environment. Real-time accurate monitoring of hydrologic variables is key for ? od forecasting, as well as for optimizing related warning systems for damage mitigation. Recent studies show that in the speci? c case of semiarid and arid areas, adequate deployment of monitoring networks is essential to a real understanding of the underlying processes generating run-off in storm events, and to achieve effective emergency systems (e. g. , [2]). Trad itionally, researchers have directly collected data at the places of interest. This has now been commonly substituted by automatic sensor and datalogger systems, which provide high temporal data resolution, while reducing operational human resource requirements. Dataloggers permit local automatic and unattended data gathering, and reduce environmental perturbation. However, data retrieval from standard dataloggers and storage in processing and control/warning centers still has to be done either manually, which prevents its applicability in ? ood warning systems, or through wired connections, which leads to substantial investments and operational costs. To confront these problems, sensor network technology has been proposed in many monitoring applications [3]. Yet, speci? c literature on sensor network for ? ood forecasting is sparse, with only a few examples available (e. . , [4–8]). Basically, a sensor network comprises a set of nodes, where each node includes a processor, a wireless radio module, a power supply, and is equipped with sensor hardware to capture environmental data. Each node performs the tasks of data gathering, physical parameter processing, and wireless data transmission to the control server. Speci? cally, for hydro logic applications, sensor nodes must also ful? ll a number of additional requirements: †¢ Power lifetime: Power sources are often not available at the locations of hydrological interest. Moreover, these locations are usually unprotected, and if renewable energy devices are used, there are prone to vandalism or theft. Thus, sensor nodes must have low-consumption, which along with existing standard batteries, should last at least one hydrologic cycle. †¢ Sensor hardware compatibility: Most hydrologic sensor nodes include a datalogger device connected through a cable to one or more measurement instruments. The datalogger must provide multiple wired interfaces to be able to communicate with a range of speci? c sensor hardware interfaces. This also involves issues of power supply, and selective time for power dispatching, which leads to optimal power management and facilitates the expansion of connected instruments. †¢ Reliability: Harsh weather conditions may cause failures in the wireless communication over the monitoring network. Backup mechanisms in local sensor dataloggers must be used to avoid information losses in unexpected crashes. †¢ Long-range communication: Hydrologic measurement locations are commonly sparse over large areas, and far away from the control center (i. e. , tens or hundreds of kilometers). Sensor nodes must have a peer-to-peer connection with the control center. Sensors 2012, 12 4215 In general, these, sometimes opposing, requirements are dif? cult to be satis? ed by existing developed solutions. For example, multiple sensor readings and long-range communication are high power-consumption tasks, which diminish battery lifetime. For instance, many existing wireless solutions for agriculture applications (e. g. , [9–11]) use a set of tens or hundreds of motes, which collaborate to gather dense data in a small area. Motes have low consumption, but they provide limited sensor interfaces, and short-range communication. On the other hand, several hydrologic and meteorologic applications have been implemented with a few wireless datalogger stations, which individually obtain multi-sensor data in a few sparse locations over a large area (e. g. , [5,12–14]). These dataloggers permit high computing and long-range communication. However, they have an excessive investment cost and a high consumption that may be, in the long-term, unsustainable. This paper describes the design, development, and deployment of a real-time monitoring system for hydrological applications. The paper is focused on the description in detail of our wireless datalogger device, so-called DatalogV1 [15], which combines the low consumption of motes and the reliable communication of most powerful multi-sensor datalogger stations in order to satisfy the requirements of ? ood warning system scenarios. The DatalogV1 provides automatic monitoring and long-term autonomy in sparse points over large areas. To demonstrate the goodness of the DatalogV1 design, we deployed a monitoring network in the Rambla del Albuj? n watershed, in Southern Spain. You read "Flood Monitoring System" in category "Papers" The severity of ? ash ? ods in the Rambla del o Albuj? n has caused important environmental and economic damages over the last years. Accordingly, the o wireless monitoring network is intended to provide real-time accurate hydrologic information to support an operational model-based ? ood warning system. This is an excellent test to asses the DatalogV1 performance and success in a real case scenario. The remainder of the paper is organized as follows. Section 2 introduces the context of environmental monitoring and ? ood warning systems. Section 3 depicts our hydrologic monitoring scenario. Section 4 presents the design of DatalogV1 hardware. Section 5 shows the implementation of DatalogV1 software. Section 6 describes the architecture developed for remote hydrologic monitoring. Section 7 describes the deployment of the monitoring network in the Rambla del Albuj? n watershed. Section 8 shows the results o obtained regarding power consumption and data collection. Section 9 provides concluding remarks. 2. Environmental Monitoring Environmental monitoring is the most popular application for sensor networks. At present, sensor networks have been applied for a number of applications as, e. . , soil moisture monitoring [16], solar radiation mapping [17], aquatic monitoring [18], glacial control and climate change [19], forest ? re alarm [20], landscape ? ooding alarm [21], and forecasting in rivers [22]. The ability to place autonomous and low cost nodes in large harsh environments without communication infrastructure enables accurate data collection directly observed from in terest areas. With sensor networks, environmental data can be observed and collected in real-time, and used for forecasting upcoming phenomena and sending prompt warnings if required. Sensors 2012, 12 2. 1. Model-Based Flood Warning System Context 4216 The developed sensor network was incorporated within the context of a model-based ? ood warning system in the Rambla del Albuj? n watershed. A model-based ? ood warning system, for mitigating the o effects of ? ooding on life and property, incorporates a catchment model based on observed/forecasted rainfall and telemetered observations of hydrologic state variables at various locations within the catchment area. Generally, observed variables are ? ow and/or water level in channels. Also, other variables such as soil moisture and piezometric levels may be of interest, depending on the watershed response. Real-time updating of the ? ood forecasting involves the continual adaptation of the model state variables, outputs and parameters, so that the forecasts for various times into the future are based on the latest available information and are optimized, in some sense, to minimize the forecasting errors (e. g. , [23]). This is the process of data assimilation. Implementation of environmental sensor networks for data assimilation within model-based ? ood warning systems involves complex engineering and system challenges. These systems must withstand the event of interest in real-time, remain functional over long time periods when no events occur, cover large geographical regions of interest to the event, and support the variety of sensor types needed to detect the phenomenon [8]. 3. Hydrological Monitoring and Forecasting in the Rambla del Albuj? n Watershed o The Rambla del Albuj? n watershed (650 km2 ) is the main drainage catchment in the Campo de o Cartagena basin, in Southern Spain (see Figure 1). The main channel in the watershed is 40 km long and ? ows into the Mar Menor; one of the big coastal lagoons in the Mediterranean (135 km2 ). The Campo de Cartagena basin is an area with semiarid Mediterranean climate, where the average temperature ranges from 14 o C to 17 o C, mean potential evapotranspiration is 890 mm yr–1 and mean precipitation is 350 mm yr–1 . Most rainfall comes in short-time storm events, and the watershed hydrologic response is highly complex and non-uniform. Previous studies have shown the complex ? ash-? ood response of the Rambla del Albuj? n watershed o and the importance of spatially distributed observation for adequate forecasting (e. g. , [2]). Also, for ? ooding evaluations, stage gauges provide an advantage over ? w gauges that the observations remain unbiased when ? ow goes out of banks, in which case the validness of calibrated rating curves (stage-? ow relationships) is prevented. In this sense, remotely-sensed information (from aerial photography and/or satellites) is appealing as it contains much more spatial information than typical stage gauge networks in operational w atersheds. Accordingly, recent studies are evaluating the potential of aerial photography and remotely sensed (from satellites) synthetic aperture radar to provide measurements over large areas of water levels and ? od extents in lakes and rivers (e. g. , TerraSAR-X or COSMO-Skymed constellations [24]). However, the current low temporal frequency of satellite acquisitions relative to gauging station sampling indicates that remote sensing still does not represent a viable replacement strategy for data assimilation into model-based forecasts [25]. Also, before the ? ow goes out of banks, the accuracy of standard stage gauges is higher than that provided by airborne information, which is key for early warnings. Thus, if economically viable, a spatially distributed network of stage gauges remains the best option to capture the observations required to feed the forecasting and data assimilation processes. Sensors 2012, 12 4217 At the Rambla del Albuj? n watershed, we implemented a hydrological monitoring system consisting o on a network of stage gauges located at eight critical junction points between major tributaries. The monitoring locations were carefully chosen in order to achieve effective water level monitoring during ? ood events and a reliable model-based forecasting system. Figure 1 shows the selected locations which are far away (? 50 km) from the control center at the University of Murcia, to the North of the watershed. In this area, an existing phone infrastructure enables the communication among the server in the control center and the DatalogV1s in the ? eld. The DatalogV1s must be autonomous only with batteries, because no power source exists in the monitoring area and solar panels are frequently stolen or vandalized. In the following sections, we describe the design and development of the DatalogV1 to provide remote data gathering of the water stage in channels during ? ods. Figure 1. Deployment scenario. The embedded image shows the location of the Rambla del Albuj? n watershed at the Southeast of the Iberian Peninsula. The violet line describes the o watershed boundary drawn on a digital terrain model (DTM). Within the watershed, the main channel network is shown in blue, and labeled squares indicate deployed gauge locations. Sensors 2012, 12 4 . Design of DatalogV1 Hardware 4218 The DatalogV1’s design was developed to address the requirements of the described application. The block diagram of DatalogV1 is illustrated in Figure 2(a). The critical components are a low-power microcontroller ( µC) module that supervises the DatalogV1’s operation, multiple sensor interfaces (Pulse, SDI-12, RS-485, Analog) that enable to take measurements from different kinds of sensor devices, and a GPRS module for long-distance communication with the control center. Moreover, two communication modules (USB and Bluetooth) enable the in-situ interactions via a laptop. All electronic components and a battery are mounted in an IP65 waterproof box to protect from harsh weather conditions, as shown by Figure 2(b). The DatalogV1’s design is balanced between low-power consumption for long-lifetime, and computational capability for multi-sensor reading and long-range communication. The hardware design of these components is described in the next subsections. Figure 2. Two different views of the DatalogV1. (a) Block diagram showing the main components. (b) The electronic components and the battery are mounted on a IP65 protection box. SDI-12 Interface RS-485 Interface Pulse Counters Analog Inputs Power Connector DC/DC Converter GPRS Module Linear Regulator Battery Connector Linear Regulator Mosfet Switch  µC DC/DC Converter Pulse Counters Bluetooth Module RS-485 Interface USB Module Battery Connector Power Connector Analogic Inputs SDI-12 Connector GPRS Module Bluetooth Module USB Module  µC (a) (b) 4. 1. Design of Microcontroller Module The circuit schematic of the microcontroller module is shown in Figure 3. The central part of the schematic represents the low-power 8-bits microcontroller (PIC18LF8722) manufactured by Microchip. The PIC18F8722 operating to 3. 3 V is ideal for low power applications ( nanoWatts) with 120 nW sleep mode and 25  µW active mode. It provides high processing speed (40 MHz) with a large 256 KB RAM memory. A 12 MB data? ash memory is included for local storage of sensor data. The top-left portion of the schematic (IC3) shows a security mechanism to avoid microcontroller blockage in case that available energy is not enough. Thus the microcontroller resets when there is less than 2. 4 V. The center-left part of the schematic contains the crystal oscillator setting to 11 MHz. (OSC1/OSC2 tags). The oscillator provides a precise clock signal to stabilize frequencies for sensor readings and data transmissions. Sensors 2012, 12 Figure 3. Circuit schematic of the microcontroller module. The center portion is the microcontroller used to control DatalogV1 operation, and the center-left is the crystal oscillator used for setting the clock. 4219 4. 2. Design of Sensor Interfaces DatalogV1 provides multi-sensor interfaces to take readings from a wide set of hydrologic instruments. Its sensor interfaces are two pulse counters, two digital connectors (RS-485 and SDI-12), and eight analog inputs. Each pulse counter reads from a tipping-bucket rain gauge (pluviometer) which generates a discrete electrical signal for every amount of accumulated rainfall. Digital interfaces supply power to and read measurements from instruments, which can themselves include some degree of computational capability. Analog connectors enable the reading of simple instruments which modify the supplying voltages to return voltage values proportional to the physical observed variables. These multiple interfaces are compatible with the most of hydrological sensor devices in the market. Pulse-counters typically connect to rain-gauge devices. The standard rain gauge collects the precipitation into a small container. Every time the container is ? led and emptied, it generates a electric pulse. According to the number of pulses and the size of the container, DatalogV1 estimates the precipitation without requiring power supply. Sensors 2012, 12 4220 For each digital interface, DatalogV1 can supply and read multiple sensors. Both RS-485 and SDI-12 interfaces consist of three electronic wires for data, ground and supplying voltage. The RS-485 is a standard serial c ommunication for long distance and noisy environments. In addition, the SDI-12 is a serial data interface at 1,200 baud designed for low-power sensors. Using serial protocols, DatalogV1 can directly obtain the physical measurements. The analog inputs allow to read 8 differential sensors, 16 single-ended sensors, or a combination of both options. A differential connection comprises four electronic wires acting as voltage-supplier, ground, positive-voltage, and negative-voltage, while a single-end connection contains two electronic wires for supplying-voltage and positive-voltage. The main difference between differential and single-ended is the way to obtain the voltage value. In single-ended, the voltage value is the difference between the positive voltage and the ground at 0 V. However, single-ended connections are sensitive to electrical noise errors, which are solved by differential connections. Because twisting wires together will ensure that any noise picked up will be the same for each wire, the voltage value in differential inputs is the difference between the positive and negative voltages. Figure 4. Circuit schematic of analog interfaces. (a) Selector of analog connections to plugged-in sensors, (b) ADC converter from output voltage to digital data. (a) (b) To obtain the measurements of the physical variables, output voltages are processed using three main hardware components: multiplexer, ampli? r, and ADC converter. Two multiplexers MC74HC4051D from Motorola company enable to select the output voltage of a speci? c analog sensor (Figure 4(a)). Each multiplexer contains 3 control pins CA0, CA1, and CA2 to choose an output voltage among 16 possibilities. The selected output voltage is ampli? ed for preserving high effective resolution. DatalogV1 use s an AD8622 ampli? er, manufactured by Analog Devices, that provides high current precision, low noise, and low power operation. The pre-con? gured ampli? cation depends on the output range Sensors 2012, 12 4221 of the selected sensor. Finally, the ampli? ed output signal is converted to a digital value through an Analog-Digital Converter (ADC), as shown by Figure 4(b). DatalogV1 contains a 13-bit ADC MCP3302, manufactured by Microchip, that provides high precision and resolution. This ? exible design provides full compatibility with presumably all kind of available sensors for hydrologic use. 4. 3. Design of GPRS Communication Module A GPRS module is used to transmit monitoring data from DatalogV1 to the control center. Figure 5 shows the GPRS module implementing all functions for wireless communications. Figure 5. Circuit schematic of the GPRS module. The center portion is the GPRS module used to control the long-distance communication, and the top-left portion is the SIM card connection. The top-left part of the circuit shows the connection of SIM phone-cards according to the manufacturer speci? cation. The bottom-left shows a uFL coaxial connector to the wireless antenna. We chose a Wavecom Q2686 chip, which is connected to the microcontroller via an USART interface (CS-USART). The Wavecom Q2686 contains a programmable 256 KB SRAM memory and includes a ARM9 32-bit processor at 104 MHz. This Q2686 chip makes possible to join a GSM/GPRS base-station and receive/send data reliably in quad-band communications on the 800, 900, 1,800 and 1,900 MHz Sensors 2012, 12 4222 bands. Also, the chip makes it easy to upgrade to 3G when needed. This GPRS module enables long-distance UDP/IP communications through cellular radio networks. 4. 4. Design of Power Module The power module consists of two power sources and three regulable mechanism to provide a secure supply of electronics components. The main energy source is a 12 V DC battery of 7,000 mAh power capacity which can be rechargeable using an optional solar panel. To adapt the input tension of the solar panel (17–20 V) to a lower tension (12–15 V) to supply the battery, we use a commutated DC/DC regulator in step-down mode, as shown by Figure 6(a). The microcontroller turns on the DC/DC regulator when it detects that the battery has a low level according to a pre-established threshold. Three circuits guarantee stable energy levels for battery, solar-panel, and sensors, as shown by Figure 6(b). The circuits of battery and solar-panel include security mechanisms to avoid a too low power level input to the sensors. For this, the circuit of sensors is used, before readings are taken, to check if the power supply is stable as to obtain an accurate measurement. Figure 6. Circuit schematic of the battery, solar-panel, and power-control modules. (a) Battery and solar modules, (b) secure power control for battery, solar panel, and sensor. (a) (b) Figure 7. Circuit schematic of the power supply module. (a) Power supply for GPRS, sensors, and ADC converter, (b) power supply for microcontroller. (a) (b) To reduce the power consumption, DatalogV1 keeps almost all electrical components deactivated, such as GPRS, sensors, and ADC. Only the microcontroller circuit is always supplied at 3. 3 V Sensors 2012, 12 4223 (Figure 7(a)) through a linear regulator LM2936 from National Semiconductor with ultra-low current in the stand-by mode. This LM2936 regulator features low drop-out voltage (50 mA) to minimize power losses. Also, this circuit includes a diode (D10) to provide a security power to protect the microcontroller and all board at most 5 V. When it is necessary, the microcontroller supplies independently the electrical components using two DC/DC converters, two linear regulators and a MOSFET switch (Figure 7(b)). Concretely to supply sensors, a DC/DC converter and the MOSFET switch is combined to create a adjustable commutation cell. The design of the commutation cell includes high-power isolated chips in order to reduce interferences. At the same time, it has a good linearity and load regulation characteristics, and allows to establish the voltage supply between 3 V and 10 V. The chosen MOSFET is a FDC6330L, manufactured by Fairchild Semiconductor, which provides high performance for extremely low on-resistance ( How to cite Flood Monitoring System, Papers

Sunday, May 3, 2020

Comparing Piagetian Vygotskian Perspectives â€Myassignmenthelp.Com

Question: Discuss About The Comparing Piagetian Vygotskian Perspectives? Answer: Introducation Piaget insisted that language is a plain milestone in development. It is language that causes development in the child growth process while Vygotsky, on the other hand, viewed language as a sign of growth. Piaget saw language as a function of development while Vygotsky viewed it as a function of growth. Also, Piaget theory believed that development takes place in four stages while Vygotsky believed there are no set of steps for development. The Piagetian theory holds that development precedes growth. It is an event that will give way to growth, but Vygotsky was of the opinion that it is growth that will occur before development. The two theories differ on the said issue with each insisting on its way. However, it is prudent that development is more complex and as such it must be preceded by growth and thus the second theory is misguided(Crawford, 2006). Another difference is on the role of environment. Piaget viewed it as a valuable input for growth while Vygotsky assumed its contribution. Another difference between the two theories is the issue of the role of social aspects. According to Piagetian theory, development cannot be detached from the social context while Vygotsky theory suggests that the two can be detached. The other difference is the issue of when learning takes place. Piaget views learning as taking place after development while Vygotsky saw learning as taking place before development(Flavell, 2008). References Crawford, K. (2006). Vygotskian approaches to human development. New York: Madigan. Flavell, J. (2008). The developmental psychology of Jean Piaget. New York: Nostrand.

Friday, March 6, 2020

Free sample - Finding the place in the sun. Single but not alone.. translation missing

Finding the place in the sun. Single but not alone.. Finding the place in the sun. Single but not alone.It would be a fair statement to claim that each person is brought into this world with a goal to obtain. To put it in other words, we, the humans, are born to put in spoke, to make a contribution, and at last to leave an imprint in the history, however loud it may sound. In this tight connection there arise the questions like where do I live? why do I have to do this? what do I need to live a decent life? Such issues can’t but touch anyone who is an indispensible part of the society. Naturally, the social environment can’t be perceived as just the medium we live in. Rather, it is a highly advanced system that comprises normal and moral principles and values, rights and responsibilities to follow and fulfill. The face and the inner nature the society has are conditioned by its integral parts being the humans. Moreover, we can judge the level of development of a particular country or a state considering the social indicators of well-being. Needless to say, with the aim to find one’s niche in social structure, everyone is passing a certain route of socialization process, from micro to macro entities. Thus, the initial environment of a child’s world outlook formation is the family. The second step of â€Å"evolution† is represented by educational institutions such as nurseries, schools, colleges, universities. But still, not everyone can take his or her place in the sun. So, what hinders the road to a cherished wish and self-actualization? Actually, the list of the factors can appear to be endless. Here, different social issues can be viewed and addressed, among which are juvenile delinquency, one-parent or disadvantaged family, etc. Up to a point, one of the above mentioned sore points is the problem of a young single mom, who happened to be in the struggle for the opportunity of getting education. Such destiny lot fell upon me, a young mom with a three year old child. Indeed, the situation is disagreeable. Whether such moms would feel in the lurch or not depends on the existence of some protection. Clearly, for the individuals not to be left high and dry, the social system is supposed to envisage the elaborated programs. In case of young moms to assist in their education a sort of subsidizing should be foreseen. A scholarship, for instance, will provide me a chance to get proper education. In addition, it will to some extent prevent the negative perception of my child as an obstacle for career. Thereby, a scholarship would also alleviate the stressful situation of simultaneous work-and-study hectic life flow, since it at least guaranties a precondition of further higher education involvement. Besides, we can’t deny the fact, in order to achieve a grant a candidate is obliged to demonstrate a corresponding level of knowledge. For now I am currently a student of a school, but aspire to major in administration of justice, which is the sphere of my interest. Hence, not of the least importance are preparatory high school extra courses and also some financial support for young moms and I am convinced they are really helpful. Why are the scholarship and financial aid so substantial? Virtually, it is one of the key factors of problem solutions. Think only, how much a young girl in the role of a mom can earn if she even didn’t get a college or university degree. The answer is obvious. As my experience shows, not too much. Therefore, in attempts to earn for a living being a mom I am left with little if no time for my education. So, a scholarship will help avoid the probability to leave school at all. Being the only breadwinner in a family by means of getting scholarship I have a true chance to save the earned money and use the scholarship to pay for tuition. I think when a young mom is forced to be out of school or college education stream, it mustn’t completely and totally deprive her of the possibility to get back and continue studying. In fact, it is the scholarship called for to meet this need. Even though, I am aware of and ready for the routine I am going to encounter. I will have to start looking for an appropriate grant what can take a lot of time. Still, the benefits can’t be neglected. After all, no sweet without sweat. A baby for a young single mom should be an incentive rather than a burden.   There is an amazingly vast scope of programs for young mothers to select from. Concerning myself, I am in the search of the scholarships to match my particular situation, my professional inclination, abilities, level of knowledge. What also matters, I’ve learned the lesson of life – a mom must never give up and lose heart but rather pluck it up. In any confusing and hard situation a life may prepare for us, we mustn’t twiddle our thumbs and give way to despair. To put it briefly, diverse factors contribute to or on the contrary encumber a person’s socialization and development. It is my firm belief, that nothing seek, nothing find and a wise proverb ‘proof of the pudding is in the eating’ is worth adding to the armory of everyone’s life.

Wednesday, February 19, 2020

Two sides on branding Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1000 words

Two sides on branding - Essay Example Naomi Klein's book,as it title implies is a criticism to the proliferation of branding strategies launched by business organisations in order to capture customers.The selection lifted from her book outlined the evolution of branding-from its earliest beginning, downfall, recovery, and recent expansion.The concept of branding, according to Klein, began with the company's recognition that production is not the main core of their operations but marketing. The earliest proponents of marketing like Nike and Microsoft stated that manufacturing is only an "incidental" part of their operations and that they are not selling "products" but "images of their brands." This early beginnings started a new age of branding previously homogenous, mass-produced commodities replacing the old shopkeeper who traditionally scoops out generic products like sugar, flour, and cereal in barrels. The popularity of Dr. Brown, Aunt Jemima, Uncle Ben, and Old Grand Dad became synonymous with the ascent of branded generic commodities.However, the death of branding came one Marlboro Friday as Phillip Morris is threatened by the intense competition from lower priced unbranded competitors. With this happening, a dramatic shift in customers' buying behavior was illustrated-from prestige to price consciousness.The article concluded with the "rebirth" and expansion of branding. This phenomenon was lead by established companies like Body Shop and Starbucks which were able to safeguard and even expand their market share by investing in their brand images. These, together with other successful companies like Nike, began the more rapid proliferation of branded products which does not only market the attributes of the product by created a "concept" to establish an "emotional connection" with its clients. Naomi Klein concluded that with this age of branding, customers are easily manipulated by branding tactics as marketers can establish a good brand even with the lowliest products. She argued that instead of focusing on production and improving products, companies are embarking and spending time, effort, and money in creating a good brand for which they ask customers for a premium. The Economist-Who's Wearing the Trousers The article lifted from the Economist, hold an antagonistic position on Naomi Klein's book. Though it also recognizes the good arguments raced by Klein, the Economist offer a very different view on what the first author referred to as "brand bullies." Basically, the article presented in the Economist can be summed up into two points-the first one being the exaggeration of Naomi Klein's argument on the power of brands, and the second one on the manipulation of the customers by the branding strategies of the large corporations. The Economist recognizes the importance of brands in selling a company's products. However, it claims that Klien's article exaggerated the role of branding in the strategies of the large business organizations. The article proved this by citing the case of the companies who spent bulk of financial resources in creating a good brand only to fail. As the company treats a "brand" as one of its primary assets, a brand can also be regarded as liability as it makes a company highly responsible in the damages which it can give to customers. Customer loyalty is not only rooted on their perception on brand. This is evidenced by the recent research which shows that customers of all ages shift from brand to brand. This also strengthens the claim of the Economist claim that customers are not highly manipulated by company's branding tactics. It is also irrefutable that companies' are spending a lot of money to retain their customers and develop their products to safeguard their brand. Between the Two Articles Naomi Klein and the Economist hold two seemingly different arguments about branding, company's performance, and customers. The two articles summarized above show some same